personRalph‐Christian Ohr event

Process Model Innovation: A vital part of Modern Dual Innovation

personRalph‐Christian Ohr event

The way we think about innovation has been trapped in stage-gate methodology for too long but now we have new theories of how innovation should work. However, there is a complexity to the economy and the enterprise that innovation thinkers need to boil down to a new set of principles.


personHaydn Shaughnessy event
Think like a startup?
personHaydn Shaughnessy event

Should large companies be looking to act like a startup? Sure, but like everything in business, the simple idea carries important nuances.


personCeline Schillinger event
Change activism for the really agile enterprise
personCeline Schillinger event

When we talk about change in the organisation, when we discuss agile, we are often automatically talking about a method. We are referencing an agreed process for bringing change about and for how to work. Perhaps this logical progression from method to outcome is not the reality of many companies. I want to talk instead of change activism, to champion the idea that activists for change are needed and that this activism, the campaign for change, is good for the enterprise. Activists can bring about a different form of agility, one that is infused with a strong sense of humanity with very significant social values attached.


personHaydn Shaughnessy event
Agile, Dual Innovation and Process Model Innovation: Where to lay your bets
personHaydn Shaughnessy event

In traditional discussions of innovation there was always a divide between execution and innovation. Or put another way, process model innovation (changing the core) has been something of a taboo. A belief grew up that execution, the process, has to be protected from change.


personFin Goulding event
The Modern Leadership Challenge
personFin Goulding event

There are leadership challenges in growing a business - as many millennials now know! But there are stranger and perhaps tougher leadership challenges in changing a business.


personHaydn Shaughnessy event

Design as Culture. The Problem of Humanising Innovation

personHaydn Shaughnessy event

Design thinking is more than just innovation. It is a broadly based approach to solving problems. But does it go far enough in humanising the world around us? Hack and Craft talked to one of the leaders of the design thinking movement in Europe, Arne Van Oosterom.


personFin Goulding event
Flow vs Agile: The Battle for a Consistent Innovation Method
personFin Goulding event

Most organisations have gone some way now towards implementing agile development techniques. It’s likely as well that they will be using lean in other areas of innovation. The idea that innovation can and should be done as cheaply as possible has taken hold in business as we all seek to innovate more and faster for the sake of survival (and prosperity of course!). Along with it, though, should come the realisation that a lot of what passes for innovation is wasted effort. We are applying methods to a process without asking if the process itself is really necessary or efficient.


personFin Goulding event
Extreme Visualisation: Methods for the Post Agile Enterprise
personFin Goulding event

It may be controversial to say it but much of what passes for “agile” in the enterprise is anything but. Agile was intended to replace waterfall development processes and it has - the result is many mini-waterfalls and, with that, a level of inefficiency that we don’t need to accept.


personRichard Martin event
Ready To Jump – Agile, Teams and Autonomy in The Peloton
personRichard Martin event

Sport is increasingly used as a model for how business teams should behave. It's also been a great example of how data can improve performance. But the emphasis on loyalty, togetherness and metrics is maybe misplaced. At least that's what Richard Martin suggests in his studies of the cycling peloton. What if teamwork also means being agile and autonomous?


personHaydn Shaughnessy event
Fostering the IT Business Dialogue Part 2: The new language of business
personHaydn Shaughnessy event

In the first part of this short series, I focused on aspects of IT that people on the business side typically don’t keep abreast of. That lag creates tension in IT-Business relationships, which in turn slows down innovation. The business often does not know what modern IT is capable of - in terms of applications, speed of delivery or integration. But the same could be said reciprocally - that IT does not always keep up with the language of business. In fact, today we are seeing a new language that only a relatively small group of companies is really on top of.