personChris Middleton event

Tech Trends 2018: The year in innovation

personChris Middleton event

Hack & Craft News present a rundown of eight technology hotspots, strategic topics, and things to watch out for this year.


personChris Middleton event
Facial recognition: Will a future criminal be wearing your face?
personChris Middleton event

Chris Middleton asks whether technologies such as Face++ point towards a future of ultimate security and conformity, or entirely new types of crime.


personChris Middleton event
Agtech: Where field and server farms meet
personChris Middleton event

The robot farmer is here, but the biggest agtech innovations will come from the IoT, big data, and analytics.


personSimon Rogerson event
Coding ethics into technology
personSimon Rogerson event

Computer Ethics Professor Simon Rogerson explains why ethical considerations are vital at the design stage as society becomes more and more reliant on technology.


personHayley Tanner event
A Smart City mission to make parking a truly forgettable experience
personHayley Tanner event

AppyParking is more than just another parking app. It’s all about Big Data with Big Detail and fits strategically within the connected car, smart city revolution. AppyParking has revolutionised the UK parking industry by consolidating the fragmented public and private sector by creating a standardised data set that understands every possible rule, restriction and tariff regardless of what kind of driver you are. This free public service in the form of app, website and API saves motorists time, stress, money and parking tickets while dramatically increasing productivity. Hack & Craft caught up with Dan Hubert, the Founder of AppyParking.


personHaydn Shaughnessy event

The Culture of Innovation Revisited

personHaydn Shaughnessy event

It is easy to give a view on the important issue of how to create a culture of innovation. Rather more difficult is to clarify what type of innovation and culture change is relevant to any given circumstances. We are currently overwhelmed with messages to “fail fast” but that is just one culture of innovation and it hardly guarantees success. It's time to widen the agenda.


personHaydn Shaughnessy event
Manifesto: The Innovation Economy
personHaydn Shaughnessy event

For the past 6 years Hack and Craft has been building products for startups and helping corporations to launch new ventures. During this time we have helped create new enterprises worth hundreds of millions of pounds, but we have also seen many teams flounder and fail. The range of teams and the problems they address is too wide to determine any recipe for success, but we have observed some basic ingredients which are common to all disruptive innovations. The main pattern in the successful teams is a very high level of interdisciplinary collaboration and knowledge sharing. It seems that an essential ingredient for viable innovation is always the synthesis of knowledge from different perspectives. With this in mind we hope H&C News will provide a forum for this knowledge sharing and help foster the innovation opportunities that arise from it. Harry McCarney MD, Hack & Craft


personAnthony Meadows event
Growing Responsiveness: Designing the Rules of Digital Transformation
personAnthony Meadows event

CIO or IT Director is a curious title these days, it’s becoming unsure of who it really is. Having held this title in major companies people assume that I am a technical geek of some sort. Nothing could be further from the truth.


personHaydn Shaughnessy event
The organisational roots of disruptive innovation
personHaydn Shaughnessy event

The classic definition on disruptive innovation has two main parts. One is the existence of organisations that have the power and resources to scale a new but untested technology; the second is that incumbent organisations focus on the current and near term needs of their existing clients. That means they spend their resources on responding to these with incremental or sustaining innovations rather than being radical.


personScott Davis event
Kids and Content: The OnRamp for AI in The World of Media
personScott Davis event

The rise of digital platforms poses a fundamental problem for conventional content distributors, and is especially problematic for producers and distributors of children’s content. Kids move fast. They have few legacy behaviours to unlearn. They have time to explore new content options and friends pushing them to try new things. And there are many options ‘good enough’ to hold their attention.