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personHaydn Shaughnessy event
By cultivating its ecosystem, did Airbnb just show Uber how to run a platform?
personHaydn Shaughnessy event

Uber dominated business news last week with its President quitting after only six months and a growing sense that the company is dysfunctional culturally. Meanwhile Airbnb has launched its new experiences programme. It is clear which of the two is getting something right but what exactly is the secret sauce?


personHaydn Shaughnessy event
Minimum Viable Product vs Product Market Fit: which will move the needle in Financial Services?
personHaydn Shaughnessy event

The concept of a minimum viable product (MVP) is now pervasive. But it is not the only way to think about market development for new products. What’s the right way to be entrepreneurial, especially if you work in a highly regulated industry like finance?


personHaydn Shaughnessy event
Think like a startup?
personHaydn Shaughnessy event

Should large companies be looking to act like a startup? Sure, but like everything in business, the simple idea carries important nuances.


personHaydn Shaughnessy event
Agile, Dual Innovation and Process Model Innovation: Where to lay your bets
personHaydn Shaughnessy event

In traditional discussions of innovation there was always a divide between execution and innovation. Or put another way, process model innovation (changing the core) has been something of a taboo. A belief grew up that execution, the process, has to be protected from change.


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Design as Culture. The Problem of Humanising Innovation
personHaydn Shaughnessy event

Design thinking is more than just innovation. It is a broadly based approach to solving problems. But does it go far enough in humanising the world around us? Hack and Craft talked to one of the leaders of the design thinking movement in Europe, Arne Van Oosterom.


personHaydn Shaughnessy event
The Culture of Innovation Revisited
personHaydn Shaughnessy event

It is easy to give a view on the important issue of how to create a culture of innovation. Rather more difficult is to clarify what type of innovation and culture change is relevant to any given circumstances. We are currently overwhelmed with messages to “fail fast” but that is just one culture of innovation and it hardly guarantees success. It's time to widen the agenda.


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Fostering the IT Business Dialogue Part 2: The new language of business
personHaydn Shaughnessy event

In the first part of this short series, I focused on aspects of IT that people on the business side typically don’t keep abreast of. That lag creates tension in IT-Business relationships, which in turn slows down innovation. The business often does not know what modern IT is capable of - in terms of applications, speed of delivery or integration. But the same could be said reciprocally - that IT does not always keep up with the language of business. In fact, today we are seeing a new language that only a relatively small group of companies is really on top of.


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Designing for the autonomous generation
personHaydn Shaughnessy event

Design thinking has become deeply embedded in strategy over the past decade but new challenges are now emerging, not least how to design for a new autonomous generation of devices, interfaces and even vehicles. Anna Haupt is an expert in combining safety and fashion and is now working for NEVS, the autonomous car company. Hack and Craft caught up with her to talk about this new world where design has to make humans comfortable and safe in advanced environments like self-driving cars.


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Manifesto: The Innovation Economy
personHaydn Shaughnessy event

For the past 6 years Hack and Craft has been building products for startups and helping corporations to launch new ventures. During this time we have helped create new enterprises worth hundreds of millions of pounds, but we have also seen many teams flounder and fail. The range of teams and the problems they address is too wide to determine any recipe for success, but we have observed some basic ingredients which are common to all disruptive innovations. The main pattern in the successful teams is a very high level of interdisciplinary collaboration and knowledge sharing. It seems that an essential ingredient for viable innovation is always the synthesis of knowledge from different perspectives. With this in mind we hope H&C News will provide a forum for this knowledge sharing and help foster the innovation opportunities that arise from it. Harry McCarney MD, Hack & Craft


personHaydn Shaughnessy event
Fostering The IT Business Dialogue Part 1: The new language of IT
personHaydn Shaughnessy event

To the IT department a minimum viable product can mean an opportunity to interact with customers with a basic new prototype. To a business leader, a minimum viable product might mean the minimum that is viable in the market. There are big differences between those two - from a few wireframes to help elicit interest, to a debugged system ready for prime time.