personHaydn Shaughnessy event

Think like a startup?

personHaydn Shaughnessy event

Should large companies be looking to act like a startup? Sure, but like everything in business, the simple idea carries important nuances.


personFin Goulding event
The Modern Leadership Challenge
personFin Goulding event

There are leadership challenges in growing a business - as many millennials now know! But there are stranger and perhaps tougher leadership challenges in changing a business.


personHaydn Shaughnessy event
Design as Culture. The Problem of Humanising Innovation
personHaydn Shaughnessy event

Design thinking is more than just innovation. It is a broadly based approach to solving problems. But does it go far enough in humanising the world around us? Hack and Craft talked to one of the leaders of the design thinking movement in Europe, Arne Van Oosterom.


personFin Goulding event
Flow vs Agile: The Battle for a Consistent Innovation Method
personFin Goulding event

Most organisations have gone some way now towards implementing agile development techniques. It’s likely as well that they will be using lean in other areas of innovation. The idea that innovation can and should be done as cheaply as possible has taken hold in business as we all seek to innovate more and faster for the sake of survival (and prosperity of course!). Along with it, though, should come the realisation that a lot of what passes for innovation is wasted effort. We are applying methods to a process without asking if the process itself is really necessary or efficient.


personJane McConnell event
Trust, Innovation and the Future of Digital Work
personJane McConnell event

In the new entrepreneurial work culture, people have to innovate through experimenting and taking risks. Employers need to demonstrate the trust factor, namely that failure is acceptable. If large firms don’t get this right they will fail at digital work.


personHaydn Shaughnessy event

Manifesto: The Innovation Economy

personHaydn Shaughnessy event

For the past 6 years Hack and Craft has been building products for startups and helping corporations to launch new ventures. During this time we have helped create new enterprises worth hundreds of millions of pounds, but we have also seen many teams flounder and fail. The range of teams and the problems they address is too wide to determine any recipe for success, but we have observed some basic ingredients which are common to all disruptive innovations. The main pattern in the successful teams is a very high level of interdisciplinary collaboration and knowledge sharing. It seems that an essential ingredient for viable innovation is always the synthesis of knowledge from different perspectives. With this in mind we hope H&C News will provide a forum for this knowledge sharing and help foster the innovation opportunities that arise from it. Harry McCarney MD, Hack & Craft


personLuba Elliott event
Art and technology – A complex alliance
personLuba Elliott event

Invite-only receptions held in grandiose mansions, guests sipping champagne while they contemplate the latest Jeff Koons work with a price-tag higher than a family-sized house a few blocks down the street: the art market conjures images of luxury, secrecy and exclusivity.


personKalie Moore event
Berlin’s coming exits – How equity will fuel the ecosystem
personKalie Moore event

The topic du jour of the Berlin startup scene has changed from last year’s “Is Berlin all hype?” to 2014’s “When is Berlin’s big exit?”


personCat Symonds event
Made in Barcelona
personCat Symonds event

The on-going economic crisis, coupled with soaring unemployment rates and hard-hitting austerity measures, has led to a proliferation of autonomous professionals and Startup companies in Barcelona, showcasing some of Europe’s most promising and intriguing ventures.


personHarry McCarney event
Tech Spaghetti launch young innovators tool kit
personHarry McCarney event

Tech Spaghetti are crowd funding a radical new approach to teaching kids innovation skills. The concept for the Young Innovator’s Toolkit was born in late 2013, when Elliot and Leah started having conversations about how to develop innovation and creative thinking in children aged six to twelve.